LATEST ARTICLE

  • Guidance to Help Prevent Worker Exposure to the COVID-19 Coronavirus

    03/26/2020




    Measures for protecting workers from exposure to, and infection with, the novel coronavirus, COVID-19 depend on the type of work being performed and exposure risk, including potential for interaction with infectious people and contamination of the work environment.

      Read More >

  • Wireless Gas Detection & Data Analysis

    12/31/2019



    An explosion at a natural gas processing plant near Plymouth, Washington, injured five workers and caused the evacuation of 400 more workers. In the first half of 2012, two refinery fires occurred in California, two separate fires happened at the same refinery plant in Indiana, along with fires reported at refineries in Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Washington.

      Read More >

  • Winter Driving Safety Tips

    12/23/2019



    Winter presents drivers – and travelers – with many hazards. Snow, ice, black ice, fog, and heavy rain can wreak havoc on the roads and on driver’s ability to carefully navigate. However, when drivers are better-prepared, they can be better on the road to handle various driving conditions. Here are specific tips on winter driving preparation and safety.

      Read More >

  • 5 Winter Weather Tips That Will Help Keep You Safe

    12/20/2019



    Do you remember that scene in A Christmas Story where Flick gets his tongue stuck to a frozen pole because of a dare? When considering safe work practices in winter weather, there are plenty of examples of things to avoid and methods to increase safety. Here are five that we recommend.

      Read More >

  • EMS Toolkits for the Ambulance

    11/01/2019



    When the call comes in and you rush to the scene of an accident or emergency, you never know exactly what you’ll encounter when you get there. That’s why, as a paramedic, you have to be ready for anything that comes your way. Your typical day could include anything from a simple sprain to a serious car accident or a mass shooting.

      Read More >

  • Maintenance of Safety Boots

    10/31/2019



    When it comes to your everyday life, taking proper care of your duty boots may not rank right up there with other high priorities. Perhaps you can’t thoroughly clean your boots every single day.

      Read More >

  • Runner Safety

    10/30/2019



    The most basic safety tips we can give are to know the rules of the road. Always run against traffic so you can see vehicles as they approach. This will help you react quickly to move out of the way if a vehicle is coming at you, where as if it’s approaching you from behind, your reaction time is greatly reduced.

      Read More >

  • First Aid Kit

    10/28/2019



    Take a moment to picture this scenario. You find yourself in an unfortunate situation where you’ve been involved in a car accident. You’re OK, but you’ve sustained some injuries like cuts and scrapes, and one particular cut is bleeding pretty heavily.

      Read More >

Guidance to Help Prevent Worker Exposure to the COVID-19 Coronavirus

03/26/2020




Measures for protecting workers from exposure to, and infection with, the novel coronavirus, COVID-19 depend on the type of work being performed and exposure risk, including potential for interaction with infectious people and contamination of the work environment.

Read More   

Tips for Employers Regarding the COVID-19 Coronavirus

03/26/2020


Tips For Employers Regarding The COVID-19  Coronavirus

Employers and workers can take important steps in keeping the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus at bay.

The National Safety Council (NSC) is closely following data about COVID-19 coronavirus, or 2019 nCoV., and it is clear that employers need to recognize their responsibility in up-keeping a healthy workforce.


The NSC says that all employers can take important measures to keep workers healthy; however, those in the healthcare sector, with employees who travel internationally and those in the international travel industry, are at particular risk of contracting the virus.


Workplace Prevention

Workplace illness prevention training is imperative for all employees, and employers should ensure their workplaces offer appropriate training.

NSC echoes recommendations from OSHA and the CDC on preventing possible transmission of the virus, including the following:
• Practice proper infection control and sterilization measures.
• Frequently wash your hands with soap and water. If soap and water is unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
• Avoid close contact with those who are sick.
• Stay home when you are sick, and see a doctor immediately to be evaluated for 2019-nCoV.
• If a worker becomes infected, insist that he or she fully recovers before returning to work.
• Employees who have traveled with heightened levels of exposure should inform their employers immediately.
• Avoid sending staff on business trips to China, where the virus has originated and has not yet been detained.


Here are a few helpful pieces of information on the virus’ transmission, symptoms, prevention, and treatments. The CDC also offers tips on what the public should do, what to do if you are sick, and other FAQs on the coronavirus:


Transmission
The coronavirus is likely a respiratory virus spread from person to person in close contact through sneezing and coughs. However, much is still unknown about the transmission of 2019-nCoV, and it’s unclear if a person can get the virus by touching a surface or object that has the virus and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes.


Symptoms and Complications
Reported cases of the virus have varied symptoms, and some infected individuals have little to no symptoms. Symptoms can include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. The CDC believes that the incubation period of the virus could be anywhere from two to 14 days after exposure. This is based on what has been previously seen with the MERS viruses. The latest situation summary updates are available on CDC’s web page 2019 Novel Coronavirus , Wuhan, China: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/summary.html


Prevention and Treatment
There is no current vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV. The best way to prevent possible transmission is by using proper disinfectant practices including washing your hands often with soap and water (after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after coughing or sneezing); avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth; avoiding close contact with people who are sick; staying home when you are sick; covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue or a sleeve; and cleaning and disinfecting touched objects and surfaces regularly.


Employers should stay up to date about the situation of the coronavirus and ensure that employers are not traveling to areas of high exposure and are using disinfectant practices. Employers can also refer to OSHA’s Guidance for Preparing Workplaces for an Influenza Pandemic—which provides helpful tips on monitoring public health crises in general. OSHA also has resources directly related to the coronavirus.


Remember to educate your employees on the signs and symptoms of the virus, provide hand sanitizer and easy access to hand-washing areas, minimize unnecessary meetings and visitors, identify workers who may have traveled to China, implement travel guidelines, and allow sick employees to work from home or take leave as appropriate.


Source : OHS https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2020/02/05/NSC-Provides-Tips-for-Employers-Regarding-the-Coronavirus-or-2019nCoV.aspx?oly_enc_id=&Page=3#


Read More   

What to do if You Are Sick With COVID-19 Coronavirus Disease

03/26/2020

What To Do If You Are Sick With COVID-19 Coronavirus Disease


If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.


Stay home except to get medical care

You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.


Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home

People: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.

Animals: Do not handle pets or other animals while sick. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.


Call ahead before visiting your doctor

If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.


Wear a facemask

You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enteryour room.


Cover your coughs and sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.


Avoid sharing personal household items

You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.


Clean your hands often

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.


Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day

High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.


Monitor your symptoms

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing). Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19. Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected or exposed.

 

Ask your healthcare provider to call the local or state health department. Persons who are placed under active monitoring or facilitated self-monitoring should follow instructions provided by their local health department or occupational health professionals, as appropriate.

 

If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the dispatch personnel that you have, or are being evaluated for COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before emergency medical services arrive.


Discontinuing home isolation

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 should remain under home isolation precautions until the risk of secondary transmission to others is thought to be low. The decision to discontinue home isolation precautions should be made on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments.




Source and for more information: www.cdc.gov/COVID19

Read More   

Wireless Gas Detection & Data Analysis

12/31/2019



An explosion at a natural gas processing plant near Plymouth, Washington, injured five workers and caused the evacuation of 400 more workers. In the first half of 2012, two refinery fires occurred in California, two separate fires happened at the same refinery plant in Indiana, along with fires reported at refineries in Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Washington.

Read More   

Winter Driving Safety Tips

12/23/2019



Winter presents drivers – and travelers – with many hazards. Snow, ice, black ice, fog, and heavy rain can wreak havoc on the roads and on driver’s ability to carefully navigate. However, when drivers are better-prepared, they can be better on the road to handle various driving conditions. Here are specific tips on winter driving preparation and safety.

Read More   

5 Winter Weather Tips That Will Help Keep You Safe

12/20/2019



Do you remember that scene in A Christmas Story where Flick gets his tongue stuck to a frozen pole because of a dare? When considering safe work practices in winter weather, there are plenty of examples of things to avoid and methods to increase safety. Here are five that we recommend.

Read More   

EMS Toolkits for the Ambulance

11/01/2019



When the call comes in and you rush to the scene of an accident or emergency, you never know exactly what you’ll encounter when you get there. That’s why, as a paramedic, you have to be ready for anything that comes your way. Your typical day could include anything from a simple sprain to a serious car accident or a mass shooting.

Read More   

Maintenance of Safety Boots

10/31/2019



When it comes to your everyday life, taking proper care of your duty boots may not rank right up there with other high priorities. Perhaps you can’t thoroughly clean your boots every single day.

Read More   

Choosing Medical Gloves

10/31/2019



Medical gloves are a critical tool used by healthcare professionals to help prevent cross-contamination between patients and caregivers. They protect both patients and medical personnel against all manner of dangerous chemicals, bacteria, and viruses.

Read More   

Runner Safety

10/30/2019



The most basic safety tips we can give are to know the rules of the road. Always run against traffic so you can see vehicles as they approach. This will help you react quickly to move out of the way if a vehicle is coming at you, where as if it’s approaching you from behind, your reaction time is greatly reduced.

Read More   

First Aid Kit

10/28/2019



Take a moment to picture this scenario. You find yourself in an unfortunate situation where you’ve been involved in a car accident. You’re OK, but you’ve sustained some injuries like cuts and scrapes, and one particular cut is bleeding pretty heavily.

Read More